Recon timing chain

Discussion in 'Honda' started by EvilElvis, Mar 4, 2012.

  1. EvilElvis

    EvilElvis New Member

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    Just curious how hard it is to either tension or replace the timing chain....
    I searched all over with no real answer:-/

    01 recon 250
  2. Awk08

    Awk08 Moderator Staff Member Technician Forum Supporter

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    of the few 4 strokes i've done timing chains on, I fish a wire down thru the cylinder opening, get your chain on the bottom gear, pull it up thru with the wire, slip the top gear into the chain and then onto the cam, replace bolt, all with the timing marks aligned at TDC
    and the auto tensioner removed, < push the tension button in and tighten the little holding bolt, install it and loosen the bolt, it will spring out and tension the chain, and continue to tension it as needed, as it is spring loaded

    and be sure the chain guides stay in their respective slots down inside
  3. EvilElvis

    EvilElvis New Member

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    Im gonna bring it to TDC today and try adjusting the valves again ......seems it doesnt want to stay on the "T" mark when I do moves a 1/4 in past it and seems like it wants to be there, I forced it to stay in place last time but still got 180-190 psi on compression ...maybe the chain jumped
  4. sicivicdude

    sicivicdude New Member

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    Alright, I'm going to tell you the best I can from memory as I don't have an actual manual handy.

    Obviously, if you have /buy /find a manual and anything I say doesn't jive.... take the manuals word for it.

    The camshaft is situated between the two case halves inside the block basically parallel to the crankshaft with a bucket sitting on each lobe with a pushrod coming up to the top end for each valve.

    The timing chain is the furthest most inside part (closest to the big end of the rod) on the drive end. It's located under the primary clutch and starter jack shaft end gear.

    The easiest way (by far) to access it is to remove the battery from the quad and stand it up straight back on it's end. Then you remove the clutch cover and you don't even have to drain the oil!

    The shift detent lever has to come out with the clutch cover on most of the honda models. so be careful not to drop it in the dirt!

    The primary and secondary clutches have to be removed along with the circlips on the starter jackshaft gears too. The tensioner is a manual spring loaded assembly bolted onto the center case halves with the timing chain going between the crankshaft and the timing gear. The exact timing marks escape me but I believe there's a mark on the timing gear that lines up with a "notch" made into the case when the piston/crank are at TDC.

    Also, the guide is a simple little partial loop thing that goes around the backside of the chain. It doesn't take much wear at all (because of the length of the chain) to be beyond the mechanical limits of the tensioner.
  5. Awk08

    Awk08 Moderator Staff Member Technician Forum Supporter

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